Engineering and Social Justice – ASEEs 6th Annual Colloquium on Engineering Education

ASEE Colloquium

The Stanford Student Chapter of ASEE—American Society for Engineering Education—is thrilled to be hosting our 6th annual colloquium on Engineering Education, with an afternoon discussing the relationships between engineering and social justice both in and beyond the classroom.

Our afternoon schedule will feature: a keynote presentation titled “The Problem is the Problem: A Strategy for Making Social Justice and Social Responsibility Visible in Engineering Education” by Prof. Juan Lucena, Prof. Jon Leydens, and Prof. Jessica Smith from the Colorado School of Mines; invited talks by Dr. Bahvna Hariharan and Dr. Khalid Kadir; and a panel discussing the intersection of engineering and social justice in Stanford courses.

We’re delighted to have so many inspiring people come together for an afternoon, so please join us for what will surely be an impactful and educational colloquium in the Old Union Ballroom on Friday April 21st from 1-6PM.

Space is limited, so please RSVP at https://goo.gl/forms/32D6C6Cmv89Rwjrv2. More detailed program information is available: https://aseestanford.wordpress.com/upcoming-events/

ASEE is co-sponsoring a WISE Research Roundtable on 23 September 2015

“Disrupting the Pipeline: Critical Analyses of Student Pathways Through Postsecondary STEM Education” by Heather Metcalf, Ph.D., Director of Research for the Association of Women in Science

When: Wednesday, September 23rd, 1:30-2:30pm
Where: Varian II (Physics and Astrophysics Building, 452 Lomita Mall), Room 102-103
Please RSVP to cbmuller@stanford.edu by Monday, September 21.

Abstract: Critical mixed methods approaches allow us to reflect upon the ways in which we collect, measure, interpret, and analyze data, providing novel alternatives for quantitative analysis. For institutional researchers, whose work influences institutional policies, programs, and practices, the approach has the transformative ability to expose and create space for altering rather than reproducing problematic institutional stratifications and inequities. The usefulness of this approach is illustrated here using examples from a critical mixed methods study of student pathways through postsecondary STEM education